This hymn is traditionally sung on Good Friday. The Porter’s Gate released a new album on Friday, September 11, 2020 featuring the song, “O Sacred Neck, Now Wounded.” It is, as the title suggests, a rewrite of the great hymn, “O Sacred Head, Now Wounded,” though the new song focuses its singers on the death of George Floyd. With thorns, Thine only crown. This poem talks about Christ’s body, as he suffered and hung on the cross. Songs and Hymns for Blended Worship #235, The Hymnal for Worship and Celebration #178, The New National Baptist Hymnal (21st Century Edition) #108, I have already donated. Alexander was often overshadowed by his father, the renowned Archibald Alexander, first professor at Princeton Theological Seminary. The present version is by James Alexander, who translated it from a German edition from 1656. The melody as it appears in movement 54 of the St Matthew Passion by Bach: The music for the German and English versions of the hymn is by Hans Leo Hassler, written around 1600 for a secular love song, "Mein G'müt ist mir verwirret [de]", which first appeared in print in the 1601 Lustgarten Neuer Teutscher Gesäng. Yet, though despised and gory, I joy to call Thee mine. O Haupt, zum Spott gebunden CH-1) O sacred head, now wounded, With grief and shame weighed down, Now scornfully surrounded With thorns, Thine only crown; O sacred head, what glory! The English translation is mainly the work of James W. Alexander (b. Hopewell, Louisa County, VA, 1804; d. Sweetsprings, VA, 1859). The pow'r of death comes o'er you, The glow of life decays, Yet angel hosts adore you. #562, Alleluia: a hymnal for use in schools, in the home, in young people's societies in devotional meetings #60, Ambassador Hymnal: for Lutheran worship #61, Book of Hymns and Tunes, comprising the psalms and hymns for the worship of God, approved by the general assembly of 1866, arranged with appropriate tunes... by authority of the assembly of 1873 #315a, Santo, Santo, Santo: cantos para el pueblo de Dios = Holy, Holy, Holy: song for the people of God #168, All tunes published with 'O sacred head now wounded', O Sacred Head, Now Wounded - (Choral Score), Trumpet Solos for Worship, Vol. O Sacred Body, wounded, now breathless in the street, The seven cantos were used for the text of Dieterich Buxtehude's Membra Jesu Nostri addressing the various members of the crucified body. 1 O sacred Head, now wounded, His translation begins, "O Head so full of bruises." my shield when I must die; Who dieth thus dies well. st. 1 = Matt 27:29, Mark 15:17-18, John 19:2-3, Isa. Bernard’s prayer to Christ’s head was the text hymnist Paul Gerhardt translated into German in the seventeenth century, and from which we have the English translation, “O Sacred Head, Now Wounded.” Just as Bernard would meditate on the crucifix, so too does this text call us to remember the wounded and broken body of Christ as He suffered for us. with thorns, thine only crown! This hymn text is often attributed to Bernard of Clairvaux, a French abbot and founder of the Cistercian Order in the early twelfth century. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or, 3201 Burton Street SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546, O sacred head, now wounded, With grief and shame weighed down, Paul Gerhardt translated "Salve caput cruentatum," the seventh section of the Latin poem "Salve mundi salutare," into German as "O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden." Da will ich glaubensvoll O make me Thine forever! with grief and shame weighed down, thy pity without end? Amy Grant’s a cappella recording is an excellent example of this. If you'd like to make a gift by check, please send it to: Hymnary.org, Calvin University, 3201 Burton Street SE, Grand Rapids, MI 49546. I joy to call Thee mine. It has seven sections, each addressing a part of Jesus’ body-his feet, knees, hands, side, breast, heart, and head. Johann Sebastian Bach arranged the melody and used five stanzas of the hymn in four different settings in his St Matthew Passion. The Danish composer Rued Langgaard composed a set of variations for string quartet on this tune. Mit höchster Ehr' und Zier, Hymns of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (1985 book), Befiehl du deine Wege § Hassler hymn tune, Online copy, New Advent (retrieved March 8, 2013), "O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden - Text and Translation of Chorale", Jesus Christus, unser Heiland, der den Tod überwand, Jesus Christus, unser Heiland, der von uns den Gotteszorn wandt, O Dearest Jesus, What Law Hast Thou Broken, The golden sunbeams with their joyous gleams, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=O_Sacred_Head,_Now_Wounded&oldid=989100723, Wikipedia articles with WorldCat-VIAF identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 17 November 2020, at 01:39. [2] It first appeared in Johann Crüger's hymnal Praxis pietatis melica in 1656. 1. Yet, though despised and gory, I joy to call Thee mine. O sacred Head, now wounded, With grief and shame weighed down, Now scornfully surrounded With thorns, Thine only crown: O sacred Head, what glory, What bliss till now was Thine! what bliss till now was thine! Lo, here I fall, my Savior! Erscheine mir zum Schilde, The poem is often attributed to Bernard of Clairvaux (1091-1153), but is now attributed to the Medieval poet Arnulf of Leuven (died 1250). The last part of the poem, from which the hymn is taken, is addressed to Christ's head, and begins "Salve caput cruentatum." Please don't show this to me again this fund drive, Author (attributed to): Bernard of Clairvaux, Author (attributed to): Arnulf, Abbot of Villers-la-Ville, A Book of Hymns for Public and Private Devotion (15th ed.) Da will ich nach dir blicken, Jetzt aber höchst schimpfieret: Ad revenue helps keep us running. O Haupt, sonst schön gezieret The editors of the Psalter Hymnal Handbook describe this as “a glorious melody whose beauty has done much to fit the private devotional text onto the lips of congregations” (PHH). O Sacred Head Now Wounded $4.29 . 5). What bliss, till now was Thine! Although Gerhardt translated the whole poem, it is the closing section which has become best known, and is sung as a hymn in its own right. How does that visage languish Which once was bright as morn! 1 O sacred Head surrounded. Be Thou my consolation, Yet, though despised and gory, I joy to call thee mine. O sacred Head, now wounded, with grief and shame weighed down, Now scornfully surrounded with thorns, Thine only crown; O sacred Head, what glory, what bliss till now was Thine! Sacred Head now wounded Sacred Head with shame weighed down What language shall I borrow To thank Thee, dearest Friend For this Thy dying sorrow Thy pity without end? Oh, make me thine forever, Alexander's translation, beginning "O sacred head, now wounded," became one of the most widely used in 19th and 20th century hymnals. oh, show thy cross to me, when my last hour draws nigh. A separate copy of this score must be purchased for each choir member. To suggest a correction to the tab: Correct tab's content with proposed changes Explain why you suggested this correction O sacred Head, now wounded, with grief and shame weighed down, Now scornfully surrounded with thorns, Thine only crown; O Sacred Head, what glory, what bliss till now was Thine! O sacred Head, now wounded, With grief and shame weighed down, Now scornfully surrounded With thorns, thine only crown: How pale thou art with anguish, With sore abuse and scorn! Wer so stirbt, der stirbt wohl. Peter, Paul & Mary and the Dave Brubeck Trio performed "Because all men are brothers" on their album "Summit Sessions". O sacred Head, what glory, what bliss till now was thine! Perfect for Good Friday, Lent, and Easter. Four verses. The German hymn begins with "O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden". The subject matter of the hymn covers the entirety of Christ’s suffering, however, so it could really be sung at any point during the service. Published in Hymns Ancient and Modern, it begins, "O sacred head surrounded by crown of piercing thorn. PLEASE NOTE: Not all verses may be sung and words may vary in the particular hymn presentation. Download worship charts, tracks, chord charts, lead sheets, individual orchestration and other resources for O Sacred Head, Now Wounded - I. Ordained in the Presbyterian Church, he alternated his career between teaching and pastoring; for two years (1849-1851) he was professor of ecclesiastical history and church government at Princeton Seminary. Yet, though despised and gory, I joy to call thee mine. In certain medieval orders, monks would spend hours meditating upon the crucifix. 12-century, French cleric and saint, Bernard of Clairvaux is the author of "O Sacred Head Now Wounded." The text by Gerhardt consists of 10 verses, of which the first and final one are transcribed below:[2]. O1 sacred Head,2 now wounded With grief and shame weighed down Now3 scornfully surounded With thorns, Thine only crown4 How art Thou pale with anguish With5 sore abuse and scorn! Deeply devotional, the text makes a very personal application of Christ's atoning death (st. 1-2) and confesses our gratitude and commitment to Christ (st. 3). In the seventeenth century it was translated into German by Paul Gerhardt, and into English from the German by James Waddell Alexander in the nineteenth century. O Sacred Head Now Wounded Lyrics: O sacred Head, now wounded / With grief and shame weighed down / Now scornfully surrounded / With thorns, Thine only crown / How pale Thou art with anguish / … Now scornfully surrounded. for one who dies believing What Thou, my Lord,6 has suffered Was all for sinners’7 gain Mine was the transgression But Thine the deadly pain The adaptation results in three verses, as follows: O sacred head, now wounded, with grief and shame weighed down; Now scornfully surrounded with thorns, thine only crown; O sacred head, what glory, what bliss ‘til now was thine! for this, thy dying sorrow, Must Thou[3]. O bleeding Head, so wounded, Reviled and put to scorn! A dramatic orchestral arrangement of the traditional hymn O Sacred Head Now Wounded. During a Tenebrae service, it could be sung after the Shadow of Desertion of the Shadow of Crucifixion & Humiliation. Yet, though despised and gory, I joy to call Thee mine. from Jesus shall not move, 1. Words by Paul Gerhardt, based on a Medieval Latin poem, tr. The first two verses are all I can reliably recall: O sacred head now wounded, With grief and shame weighed down, now scornfully surrounded With thorns thine only crown: how pale thou art with anguish, with sore abuse and scorn! Dich fest an mein Herz drücken. Und laß mich sehn dein Bilde Alexander translated a number of hymns from Greek, Latin, and German but is mainly known today for his translation of "O Sacred Head.". 1 O sacred Head, now wounded, with grief and shame weighed down, now scornfully surrounded. come, Lord, and set me free! The text by Gerhardt consists of 10 verses, of which the first and final one are transcribed below: O sacred Head, now wounded. 2 (Arranged with Keyboard Accompaniment), French Horn Solos for Worship (Arranged with Keyboard Accompaniment), The Cross, The Grave, The Skies! It is also employed in the final chorus of "Sinfonia Sacra", the Ninth Symphony of the English composer Edmund Rubbra. 2 I see your strength and vigor. He studied at New Jersey College (now Princeton University) and Princeton Seminary. We are so grateful to be able to provide timeless hymns to all and thankful to all who support us with gifts of time, talent and treasure. Yet, though despised and gory, was all for sinners’ gain. Alexander’s translation has undergone many alterations over the years, so it is nearly impossible to find any two modern hymnal versions in agreement about the text as a whole. James W. Alexander then translated the German into the English "O Sacred Head Now Wounded. Gegrüßet sei'st du mir! If this score will be projected or included in a bulletin, usage must be reported to a licensing agent (e.g. Below are the same verses, in the 1830 version by J.W. CH-4) What Thou, my Lord, hast suffered, Was all for sinners’ gain; Mine, mine was the transgression, To donate online, please use the Calvin University secure giving site. ", referring to Bridges' translations for the Yattendon Hymnal, of which he was the editor. James W. Alexander; Music by Hans Leo Hassler, harm. Yet, though despised and gory, I joy to call Thee mine. Mit einer Dornenkron; Lord, let me never, never It is not an activity we can ever particularly enjoy doing, but in the midst of reflecting on this in sorrow, we find buried, beneath our grief and shame, a pearl of joy; we can call this Savior, “though despised and gory,” our own. Originally from a Latin poem beginning "Salve mundi salutare" and attributed to either Bernard of Clairvaux (twelfth century) or Arnulf von Loewen (thirteenth century), "O Sacred Head" is one of seven sections to be used for meditation during Holy Week. And tremble as they gaze. O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden, Look on me with thy favor, 1. Yet, though despised and gory, Will no one rise and speak of violence and oppression which hanged You from that tree? Mine, mine was the transgression, Each section focuses on one aspect of Christ's dying body. Representative Text. In 1830 a new translation of the hymn was made by an American Presbyterian minister, James Waddel Alexander (1804-1859). 53:3-5. He also used the hymn's text and melody in the second movement of the cantata Sehet, wir gehn hinauf gen Jerusalem, BWV 159. Voll Schmerz und voller Hohn, O sacred head, sore wounded, Defiled and put to scorn; O kingly head, surrounded. With grief and shame weighed down. FlexScores are available in the Media section below. O Sacred Head, Now Wounded Lyrics. and Enl.) He reworked the Latin version to suggest a more personal contemplation of the events of Christ's death on the cross. O Sacred Head Now Wounded [#OSacredHeadNowWounded #OSacredHeadNow #OSacredHead #SacredHeadNowWounded #HeadNowWounded #NowWounded] Song based on the Bible verses: Matthew 27:28-29 28 And they stripped Him and put a scarlet robe on Him. 1. with grief and shame weighed down, ", Catherine Winkworth also translated the text and published it in her collection of German hymns, Lyra Germanica, giving it the title Ah wounded Head! By crown of piercing thorn! O sacred Head, now wounded, with grief and shame weighed down, Now scornfully surrounded with thorns, Thine only crown; O sacred Head, what glory, what bliss till now was Thine! Each was a meditation on a particular part of Christ's body--feet, knees, hands, sides, breast, heart and face. Another English translation, based on the German, was made in 1861 by Sir Henry Williams Baker. They would mentally divide the body of Christ into parts and meditate on each part respectively. Are parts of this score outside of your desired range? In deiner Kreuzesnot! His ten-stanza translation was published in Johann Crüger's (PHH 42) Praxis Pietatis Melica (1656). [5] Bach used the melody on different words in his Christmas Oratorio, in the first part (no. Try, Santo, Santo, Santo: cantos para el pueblo de Dios = Holy, Holy, Holy: song for the people of God (2019), p.256, It looks like you are using an ad-blocker. … The tune was appropriated and rhythmically simplified for Gerhardt's German hymn in 1656 by Johann Crüger. Paul Gerhardt (PHH 331) translated the seventh section ("Salve caput cruentatum"), which addresses Christ's head, into German ("O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden"). Fernando Ortega sings this beautiful version of “O Sacred Head Now Wounded,” a hymn attributed to Bernard of Clairvaux, taken from a poem that first appeared in the 14th century. upon Thy cross shall dwell, It was published in Joshua Leavitt's The Christian Lyre (1830) and revised by Henry W. Baker (PHH 342) for Hymns Ancient and Modern (1861). This hymn needs little accompaniment, for the text and voices crying out, along with the “glorious melody,” is enough to carry the song. These eyes, new faith receiving, #576, Renew! Alexander: O sacred Head, now wounded, Will no one stop and listen? And should I fainting be Lord, let me never, never Outlive my love to Thee! In the Hymnal 1982, “O Sacred Head Sore Wounded” is found at number 168. Mine eyes shall then behold Thee, what bliss till now was Thine! 4 Be near when I am dying, For at least one verse, have the instruments drop out entirely and sing a cappella, making use of Bach’s beautiful harmonies. O sacred Head, now wounded, with grief and shame weighed down; now scornfully surrounded with thorns, thine only crown; O sacred Head, what glory, what bliss till now was thine! dies safely, through thy love.Source: Voices Together #325, Scripture References: "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded" is a Christian Passion hymn based on a Latin text written during the Middle Ages. "Stop Error" on Provincial by John K Samson also uses the same melody. Works well as a solo, or with choir, depicting the crucifixion of Jesus. O Sacred Head, Now Wounded Words: Attributed to Bernard of Clairvaux Music: Passion Chorale | Hans Leo Hassler; harmony by Johann Sebastian Bach. outlive my love to thee. Yet, though despised and gory, I joy to call Thee mine. The hymn comes from an English translation (of the original Latin) made in 1830 by James Alexander, a Presbyterian minister. The author of the original Latin text is often disputed. How pale thou art with anguish… What Thou, my Lord, hast suffered, was all for sinners’ gain; Bernard (some think it was medieval poet Arnulf of Louvain) wrote a poem of fifty lines for each part of Christ’s body - his feet, hands, side, breast, heart, and head, and called it, “A rhythmic prayer to any one of the members of Christ suffering and hanging on the Cross” ('members' here refers to body parts). Some argue it was written by Arnulf of Louvain in the thirteenth century, but most attribute the text to Bernard of Clairvaux, as part of a seven-part prayer to the suffering body of Christ on the cross. O Sacred Head Sore Wounded ~ Lyrics. He suffered because of His love for us; we remember because of our love for Him. Remind me of Thy passion The harmonization used for "O Sacred Head, Now Wounded" is adapted from J. S. Bach's setting in St. Matthew Passion, 1729. (Reproducible Handbell Settings of Classic Hymn Tunes for Lent and Easter), O SACRED HEAD, NOW WOUNDED - Lead Line (Lutheran Book of Worship 1978 - 117), O SACRED HEAD, NOW WOUNDED (Evangelical Lutheran Worship 2006 - 351), O SACRED HEAD, NOW WOUNDED (Blue Psalter Hymnal 355), Bradbury's Golden Shower of S.S. Melodies: a new collection of hymns and tunes for the Sabbath school #28, Glory to God: the Presbyterian Hymnal #221, Lift Up Your Hearts: psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs #168. but thine the deadly pain. Yet, though despised and gory, I joy to call Thee mine. Consider a simple piano and violin accompaniment, as demonstrated by Fernando Ortega in his recording. The hymn is based on a long medieval Latin poem, Salve mundi salutare,[1] with stanzas addressing the various parts of Christ's body hanging on the Cross. Bach also craftily employed the melody as a counterpoint in half-time in the opening aria of the cantata Komm, du süße Todesstunde, BWV 161, and set it for four parts to close that cantata. Hymnal editor Carlton Young describes this practice of "setting a new sacred text to a popular secular melody for the purpose of reaching a wider audience" as the historical musical practice known as contrafactum . But James Alexander was also a fine preacher, teacher, and writer. "O Sacred Head" has enjoyed great popularity since 1656; the hymn appears in all modern hymnals, in many languages and translations, and with various numbers of stanzas. O sacred Head, what glory, and grant to me thy grace. The English Hymnal, 1906 has a translation attributed to "Y.H. 2. Karen Lynn Davidson (born 1943) wrote another English translation, titled "O Savior, Thou Who Wearest a Crown," which is published in Hymns of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (1985 book).[4]. ", African Methodist Episcopal Church Hymnal #133, Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. This article will get too long if we reflect on all five verses in the Hymnal 1982 , so I have selected verses one through three for our meditation. Zum Trost in meinem Tod, now scornfully surrounded 3 What language shall I borrow The original poem consisted of seven sections of verse. Franz Liszt included an arrangement of this hymn in the sixth station, Saint Veronica, of his Via crucis (Stations of the Cross), S. 504a. What thou, my Lord, has suffered was all for sinners’ gain: We will now have a reflection upon the hymn. The poem was translated into German by the Lutheran hymnist Paul Gerhardt (1607–1676). In 1899 the English poet Robert Bridges (1844-1930) made a fresh translation from the original Latin, beginning "O sacred Head, sore wounded, defiled and put to scorn." Albert Bailey describes the Latin text as “thoroughly medieval and monkish in conception” (The Gospel in Hymns, 274). My heart by faith enfolds Thee. I joy to call thee mine. 29 When they had twisted a crown of thorns, they put it on His head, and a reed in His right hand. Today, please consider a gift and a word of encouragement to support our work. With mocking crown of thorn: What sorrow mars Thy grandeur? Sacred Head now wounded Sacred Head with shame weighed down O sacred Head, now wounded With grief and shame … ’Tis I deserve thy place. Original Key: A Minor MP3. 2 What thou, my Lord, hast suffered Now scornfully surrounded CCLI, OneLicense, etc). Mauricio Kagel quoted the hymn at the end of his oratorio Sankt-Bach-Passion telling Bach's life, composed for the tricentenary of Bach's birth in 1985. and should I fainting be, O sacred Head, now wounded, with grief and shame weighed down, Now scornfully surrounded with thorns, Thine only crown; O sacred Head, what glory, what bliss till now was Thine! and for my rescue, flying, The tune HERZLICH TUT MICH VERLANGEN, also known as PASSION CHORALE, was originally composed for a secular German courting song entitled, “Confused are all my feelings, A tender maid’s the cause.” It’s either quite funny or slightly disturbing that the same tune can be used for something as quaint as an old love song, and something as reverent and somber as this Passion hymn. 2. This is stanzas 1, 2 and 6 of the 11 verses in the American translation done by J.W.Alexander about 1830. How does that visage languish Which once was bright as morn! How does that visage languish, Which once was bright as morn! with thorns, Thine only crown; The melody of "American Tune" by Paul Simon is based on the hymn. This is the version used in the 1940 Hymnal (Episcopal), the 1982 Hymnal (Episcopal; stanzas 1-3 and 5), and the Church of England's New English Hymnal (1986) and several other late 20th-century hymn books. The hymn was first translated into English in 1752 by John Gambold (1711–1771), an Anglican vicar in Oxfordshire. Yet, though despised and gory, I joy to call Thee mine. with thorns, thine only crown! Here are the first and third verses of the song: O Sacred Neck, now wounded, pressed down by blows and knees, this son of God surrounded by silent enemies. O sacred Head, now wounded, with grief and shame weighed down, Now scornfully surrounded with thorns, Thine only crown; O sacred Head, what glory, what bliss till now was Thine! O sacred Head, what glory, O Sacred Head, Now Wounded is based on a long medieval poem attributed to Bernard of Clairvaux, ‘Salve mundi salutare’. The three verses shown in the Psalter Hymnal are the most common, though some hymnals include a fourth verse which begins: “Be near me, Lord, when dying; O show thy cross to me….”. Paul Gerhardt wrote a German version which is known by its incipit, "O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden". to thank thee, dearest Friend, A gift and a reed in his right hand languish, which once was bright as morn my consolation my... Arrangement of the original poem consisted of seven sections of verse often overshadowed by his father, glow! Gerhardt ( 1607–1676 ), tr ” ( the Gospel in Hymns and! By James Alexander was often overshadowed by his o sacred head, now wounded all verses, the glow of decays! Favor, and Easter mars thy grandeur suggest a more personal contemplation of the poem... Visage languish which once was bright as morn I must die ; Remind me thy! 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